The Bathroom Renovation

best-laid plans

Best-laid plans

Whether you’re doing everything yourself or calling in contractors, you’ll need plans to refer to during the refurbishment. Mistakes occur when ideas are left vague so creating a drawing will ensure the redesign is kept on track.

Floor-plan

  • Make yourself a perfect pencil sketch of the shape of the room, as seen with a bird’s aye view.
  • Measure and mark down the length of every wall, and section of wall. Also measure the height of the room and note this alongside the sketch.
  • Measure the width and height of windows and doors and note where they start and finish mark those on the drawing too. Add details such as the swing of the door.
  • Mark plumbing outlets such as the soil pipe, and any major or permanent fixtures such as boiler, or any housing for gas pipes.
  • Now transfer this rough sketch to a piece of grape paper and draw it accurately to scale.

You could also sketch each elevation to show heights, but the basic bird’s eye view floor plan is normally enough to design a layout.

Layout

Take careful note of the measurements of the bath, WC, basin, furniture and other fixtures you want to include in your bathroom. Draw them to the same scale as the floor plan and cut them out. Now position them on your plan to see what will fit and make sure you consider circulation space around each piece as well as the height they reach.

Mood boards

To help you decide on the look you want collect samples of tiles, paint charts, fabric swatches and lots of cuttings from magazines and brochures. Glue them in place on cardboard to give a visual view of general ‘ mood’ you want in your finished bathroom.

 

Five Benefits of Glazed Tiles

glazed tiles

Five benefits of glazed tiles

  • Unlimited color variations
  • stain resistance
  • superior waterproofing
  • extremely hygienic
  • easy to clean

Once grouted in place, you won’t be able to remove tiles without breaking them. So be cautious if you’re following a specific color trend that may date quickly. Aqueous blues and green seems to be standing the test of time and white is a classic choice.

Don’t just think about color, but consider size, shape and texture too. All have a bearing on the look of a room. Larger squares can open up a room more, while rectangles running vertically will make a room appear taller. Texture is also very important. It can add visual interest to a plain color such as white, and tactile interest when you touch the tiles. However, it’s best to opt for a subtle texture that won’t harbor dirt or germs.

 

Practically Speaking

buying your toiletries.
Think about the practicalities as well as the aesthetics when buying your toiletries.First of all.a large glass bottle may look lovely,but it’ll be very slippery in wet hands,and certainly isn’t safe around children.It ‘s liable to shatter if dropped,leaving you treading barefoot around slivers of glass.And it’s heavy enough,it’s likely to crack or chip your ceramic tiles or basin.Beware too of some metal bottles_surprisingly,they are not all rust-proof and you could be left with rusty stains that are difficult to remove.

Fitted Bathroom Furniture

fitted furniture

Fitted furniture

The days of solid banks of cupboards overpowering a bathroom design are gone. Now, fitted furniture is trying not to look so…fitted. Yes, you can still opt for a run of base units stretching from wall to wall, but it’s much more visually stimulating to mix and match using a selection of versatile pieces.

Base units

These floor standing cabinets are the staple elements of any range of fitted furniture. For a less heavy look, opt for plinth free designs with stylish chrome legs, or a recessed plinth that gives the impression of ‘floating’. You can even wall mount units to free up the floor, making the room feel more spacious and cleaning easier. Select a variety of depths, such as slimline 20 cm where space is tight or a comfortable 50 cm to inset a basin. You can also vary a skyline with a range of heights.

Wall units

Head light storage is easy to access. To make wall units seems less uniform and imposing, select a variety of heights, widths and depths. Use frosted glass doors for a lighter look and consider how they will open sliding doors or upwards bi folding doors will be more space saving.

Small concerns

If you have small bathroom, your first thought may be squeezing in furniture will make the space even more cramped. However, slimline fitted furniture can have the opposite effect. Use a bank of units with a depth of about 20 cm to conceal the toilet cistern, to hide away pipes and to form a support for a semi inset basin. Streamlining one wall of the room can make the space appear deceptively large.